Past Events

Photographs by Avenali Resident Fellow Sheba Chhachhi and Sonia Jabbar
Thursday, Feb 17, 2005 to Friday, Feb 25, 2005
Department of Art Practice Exhibit Room, 235 Kroeber Hall
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United States

This photo installation by Chhachhi and Sonia Jabbar invites viewers to enter the private life of war, to hear voices often obscured by the clamor of stereotypes—the unheard voices of ordinary women of the Kashmir Valley. Testimonies gathered over six years break through the homogenizing divide of “Muslims” versus “Hindus.” Despite many differences, the women have one overwhelming thing in common: a rejection of the gun as a solution to political issues.

Image of a soldier flailing with a scarf around his eyes, created by Alice Wingwall.
Artworks by Alice Wingwall
Exhibit
Thursday, Feb 17, 2005 to Monday, Apr 4, 2005
Townsend Center, 220 Stephens Hall
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United States

This show features an in-depth look at the artwork of Alice Wingwall. A sculptor, photographer, and filmmaker, Wingwall experienced a progressive loss of vision as a result of retinitis pigmentosa. Her self-portraits and drawings attest to her deep knowledge of and relationship with architecture. 

Photographs by Avenali Resident Fellow Sheba Chhachhi
Tuesday, Feb 8, 2005 to Saturday, Feb 19, 2005
Department of Architecture Exhibit Room, 108 Wurster Hall
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United States

This exhibition relocates the mythological figure of Neelkanth, in the contemporary Indian city, where each of the five elements (earth, fire, water, air, and ether), the five senses (smell, sight, taste, touch, and hearing), and the power of the word itself is poisoned. The exhibit asks if we, like the archetypal Neelkanth, can find means of containment and transformation; if we can make nectar from poison.

Low-angled photo of two women holding hands and wearing simple robes.
Photographs by Avenali Resident Fellow Sheba Chhachhi
Exhibit
Friday, Feb 4, 2005 to Tuesday, Feb 15, 2005
Townsend Center, 220 Stephens Hall
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United States

Sheba Chhachhi, an installation artist, photographer, activist, and writer based in New Delhi, India, was on campus for the month of February 2005 in a visit organized by the Women’s Studies department and funded by the Townsend Departmental Residency Program. Created in collaboration with women renunciates and ecstatics in various parts of India, the photographs in this exhibition seek to share the unusual lives of contemporary women sadhus—from the almost naked beatific to the power-dressing female mahant.

Photograph of a woman before a scene of the Moldovan countryside.
Photographs by Mimi Chakarova, Keli Dailey & Gosia Wozniacka
Exhibit
Wednesday, Sep 1, 2004 to Friday, Oct 15, 2004
Townsend Center, 220 Stephens Hall
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United States

After the collapse of communism, more than 200,000 young Moldovan women have been trafficked and sold abroad. Poverty and desperation are the prevailing factors in this modern-day flesh trade. Chakarova’s photographs examine the living conditions in the villages of the poorest country in Europe.

Photo of Ann Chamberlain.
Artworks by Ann Chamberlain
Exhibit
Friday, Mar 26, 2004 to Tuesday, May 18, 2004
Townsend Center, 220 Stephens Hall
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United States

Ann Chamberlain explains that “Islands of San Francisco is an exercise in mapping the city as a series of islands, imagining what is isolated, revealed, concealed, or adrift. Perhaps this is an exercise in mythologies of place—archipelagos or constellations, sacred mountains, gated enclaves, nature preserves, or even penal colonies—all linked by common species, activities, or interests. By mapping I hope to reveal some of these layers and associations, both the pinnacles and the underbelly of the city.”

With Una's Lecturer Mary Louise Pratt
Wednesday, Mar 17, 2004 | 4:00 pm
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall
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United States

A roundtable with Mary Louise Pratt and Berkeley faculty.

Tuesday, Mar 16, 2004 | 4:00 pm
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall
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United States

Panel Discussants: Mary Louise Pratt, Claire Kramsch (Berkeley Language Center), Bharati Mukherjee (English), Geoffrey Nunberg (Center for the Study of Language and Information, Stanford University) and José David Saldívar (English, Ethnic Studies)

Photo of Mary Louise Pratt.
“English Only vs. National Security: Language and Contemporary Geopolitics”
Una's Lecture
Monday, Mar 15, 2004 | 7:30 pm
Morrison Reading Room, Doe Library
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United States

Mary Louise Pratt is Silver Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at New York University.

Image of a print of a somber-faced Kabuki actor.
Memorial Prints of Kabuki Actors from the private collection of Professor Al Dien
Exhibit
Tuesday, Jan 27, 2004 to Friday, Mar 19, 2004
Townsend Center, 220 Stephens Hall
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United States

In Actors in Death: Commemorative Prints from the World of Kabuki, the Townsend Center presents memorial prints of Kabuki actors, woodblock prints from the collection of Stanford professor Albert Dien that date from the late 18th century through the early 20th century and the heyday of Kabuki theater in Japan.

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