Past Events

“Ethnography on Film”
Thursday, Apr 3, 2003 | 4:00 pm
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall
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United States

Panel Discussants: Frederick Wiseman, Laura Nader (Anthropology), Candace Slater (Spanish & Portuguese) and Loïc Wacquant (Sociology)

Photo of Frederick Wiseman.
“The Making and Reading of a Documentary Film”
Una's Lecture
Wednesday, Apr 2, 2003 | 7:30 pm
Wheeler Auditorium
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United States

Documentary filmmaker Frederick Wiseman uses the “direct cinema” tradition of documentary filmmaking—continued filming of human conversation and the routines of everyday life with no music, interviews, or voice-over narration—to powerfully examine social institutions in America.

Photo of the shadow of the photographer over a textured wall.
Photographs by John Jenkins and Eric Theise
Exhibit
Monday, Mar 31, 2003 to Friday, May 30, 2003
Townsend Center, 220 Stephens Hall
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United States

Recent scholarship suggests that contemporary photographers are returning to photography’s origins, resurrecting obsolete photographic technologies in their work. Such artists are “looking forward by looking backward.” This exhibition explores the relevance of obsolete technologies to contemporary photographic practice.

Sepia photo of a man standing in a shrine in front of a mountain scene. Taken by Linda Connor.
Photographs by Linda Connor
Exhibit
Monday, Feb 3, 2003 to Thursday, Mar 20, 2003
Townsend Center, 220 Stephens Hall
  --
United States

This exhibit features photographs taken by Linda Connor in 2002 in Turkey and India, including eight images of the Bedrock Church in Cappadocia.

The Ecology of Food
Wednesday, Nov 13, 2002 | 4:00 pm
Maude Fife Room, 315 Wheeler Hall
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United States

Panel Discussants: Michael Pollan, Catherine Gallagher (English), Ignacio Chapela (Environmental Science, Policy and Management) and Patricia Unterman (restaurant critic, the San Francisco Examiner)

Photo of Michael Pollan.
“Cannabis, the Importance of Forgetting, and the Botany of Desire”
Avenali Lecture
Tuesday, Nov 12, 2002 | 7:30 pm
Morrison Reading Room, Doe Library
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United States

Michael Pollan's work examines the intersections between science and culture, focusing most specifically on food. Pollan is the author of In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto, winner of the James Beard Award, The Omnivore's Dilemma, which was named one of the ten best books of the year by both The New York Times and The Washington Post, and The Botany of Desire, among others.

Small image of a texture pattern created by Amanda Hughen.
Artworks by Amanda Hughen
Exhibit
Friday, Nov 1, 2002 to Sunday, Dec 1, 2002
Townsend Center, 220 Stephens Hall
  --
United States

Amanda Hughen, MFA candidate in the Department of Art Practice, explores the boundaries between the natural and the synthetic through patterns formed from geometric shapes. She explores specific dichotomies—the intuitive and the rational, the mass-produced and the unique, precision and imperfection, chaos and order—with particular attention to the thin line that separates these seemingly opposite states.

Photo of an overhead view of the bay area, taken in black and white.
Stillhere art/science collaborative
Exhibit
Tuesday, Oct 1, 2002 to Monday, Oct 21, 2002
Townsend Center, 220 Stephens Hall
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United States

The Stillhere collaborative of Robin Grossinger and Christine Reed uses the captivating images of George Russell, an under-recognized 20th-century aerial explorer, to continue their investigation of the rapid transformation of the physical landscape of the Bay Area. In this exhibit, selections of Russell’s work, rescued from a Fresno chicken coop, are accompanied by a series of intricate graphic stories combining photographs, old maps, and fragmentary biographic details.

With Una's Lecturer Nicholson Baker
Wednesday, Apr 17, 2002 | 4:00 pm
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall
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United States

Baker with David Henkin (History) and Carla Hesse (History).

Photo of Nicholson Baker.
“Bombs and Bibliographies: The Secret Life of the Library of Congress”
Una's Lecture
Monday, Apr 15, 2002 | 7:30 pm
Morrison Reading Room, Doe Library
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United States

Novelist and nonfiction writer Nicholson Baker is the author of The Mezzanine; Room Temperature; Vox; The Fermata; and The Everlasting Story of Nory, among others. Often addressing provocative topics such as voyeurism and planned assassination, Baker’s work is known for its focus on minute details and careful characterizations through the exploration of his characters' and narrators' stream of consciousness.

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