All Townsend Fellows

Image of Michael Dear.
Michael Dear, City & Regional Planning
Professor
2011-2012

Michael Dear is Professor of City and Regional Planning in the College of Environmental Design and co-director of the Disability Studies Research Cluster on campus. His current research focuses on comparative urbanism, and the future of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands.

Image of David Carroll Simon.
David Carroll Simon, Comparative Literature
Dissertation Fellow
2011-2012

In “Careless Engagements: Literature, Science, and the Ethics of Indifference in Early Modernity,” David Carroll Simon (Comparative Literature) offers a new account of the emergence of experimental science in seventeenth-century England, uncovering the affective dimensions of obj

Image of Luba Golburt.
Luba Golburt, Slavic Languages & Literatures
Assistant Professor Fellow
2010-2011

In “The First Epoch: The Eighteenth Century and the Russian Historical Imagination,” Assistant Professor Luba Golburt (Slavic Languages & Literatures) argues that the Russian Romantic historical consciousness matured through a close examination of the eighteenth century.

Image of Erika Balsom.
Erika Balsom, Film & Media
Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow
2010-2011

Erika Balsom's research focuses on the intersections between cinema and contemporary art. Ms. Balsom recently completed her doctoral dissertation, "Exhibiting Cinema: The Moving Image in Art After 1990," in the Department of Modern Culture and Media at Brown University.

Image of Venus Bivar.
Venus Bivar, History
Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow
2010-2011

Venus Bivar recently completed a Ph.D. in history at the University of Chicago. Her dissertation, entitled “The Ground Beneath their Feet: Agricultural Industrialization and the Remapping of Rural France, 1945-1976,” examines the role of land-use policy in the postwar industrialization of French farming.

Image of Theodore Martin.
Dissertation Fellow
2010-2011

Titled "Contemporary Drift: The History of the Present and the Afterlife of Genre," Theodore Martin’s dissertation in English asks what we mean when we talk about “contemporary literature.”

Image of Nadia Ellis.
Nadia Ellis, English
Assistant Professor Fellow
2010-2011

Using the Anglophone Caribbean as a node to explore black transnational subjectivity, the research of Assistant Professor of English Nadia Ellis considers the ways in which writers from the region represent overlapping spaces of belonging.

Image of Anastasia Kayiatos.
Anastasia Kayiatos, Slavic Languages & Literatures
Dissertation Fellow
2010-2011

In “Silence and Alterity in Russia after Stalin, 1955-1975,” Anastasia Kayiatos (Slavic Languages & Literatures) explores the conditions of speech and speechlessness under which the Soviet Union’s “others”—those marginalized by bodily differences of sexuality, gender, race, and disability—came to be as subjects and came together as socialites within late socialism.

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