All Townsend Fellows

Image of Stephen Best.
Stephen Best, English
Associate Professor Fellow
2011-2012

Associate Professor of English Stephen Best is the author of The Fugitive's Properties: Law and the Poetics of Possession, a study of property, poetics, and legal hermeneutics in nineteenth-century American literary and legal culture. His research and teaching interests include American Literature to 1900, African American literature, law and literature, and slavery.

Image of Jasper Bernes.
Jasper Bernes, English
Dissertation Fellow
2011-2012

Arguing that labor is central to the understanding of aesthetic activity, Jasper Bernes’s research in English asks what the work of art shares with work in general.

Image of Ramona Martinez.
Ramona Martinez, Law Library
Library Fellow
2011-2012

The research of Ramona Martinez (Law Library) will trace the history of legal publishing in California to uncover the reasons for the legal battle between Eugene Casserly and George Fitch, who vied for the office of State Printer, which was created by the second law passed in the first session (1849-50) of the California Legislature.

Image of Scott Millspaugh.
Scott Millspaugh, Italian Studies
Dissertation Fellow
2011-2012

Scott Millspaugh’s research examines the nationalist, Romantic notions of the origins of Italian literature that have gone largely unchallenged since the decade after Italian unification.

Image of Jake Kosek.
Jake Kosek, Geography
Assistant Professor Fellow
2011-2012

In “The Making of the Modern Bee: Towards a Critical Natural History of the Honeybee,” Assistant Professor of Geography Jake Kosek uses the honeybee to examine both the complex relationships between society and the environment and the roles of nature in the making of forms of social difference.

Image of Greg Castillo.
Greg Castillo, Architecture
Associate Professor Fellow
2011-2012

Greg Castillo's current research project explores the political economy of "Aufbaupathos" or "reconstruction fervor" to determine how distinctive modes of affect under the East's state socialism and the West's social market economy structured collective access to a post-fascist future.

Image of Nadia Ellis.
Nadia Ellis, English
Assistant Professor Fellow
2010-2011

Using the Anglophone Caribbean as a node to explore black transnational subjectivity, the research of Assistant Professor of English Nadia Ellis considers the ways in which writers from the region represent overlapping spaces of belonging.

Image of Venus Bivar.
Venus Bivar, History
Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow
2010-2011

Venus Bivar recently completed a Ph.D. in history at the University of Chicago. Her dissertation, entitled “The Ground Beneath their Feet: Agricultural Industrialization and the Remapping of Rural France, 1945-1976,” examines the role of land-use policy in the postwar industrialization of French farming.

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