All Townsend Fellows

James Porter, Classics and Rhetoric
Senior Faculty Fellow
2018-2019
James Porter’s (Classics and Rhetoric) wide-ranging scholarship encompasses Greek and Roman aesthetics, literary criticism, philosophy, and ancient and modern cultural critiques. Currently, he is exploring the idea of Homer from antiquity to the present.
 
Associate Professor Fellow
2018-2019
Christine Philliou (History) works on the transformation of the Ottoman Empire into the Modern Middle East and Balkans (1821-1922) and the ways in which that empire lived on in seemingly unconnected nation-states and regions.
 
Evan Muzzall, Digital Humanities
Postdoctoral Fellow
2018-2019
Evan Muzzall’s (Digital Humanities) work engages with a broad range of technological and anthropological issues — from the study of machine learning, to the ways in which environmental and cultural influences affect skeletal and dental development.
 
Dissertation Fellow
2018-2019
Melanie Gudesblatt (Music) works on the cultural history of voice in opera around 1900, focusing on how listeners used musical experience as a tool for grappling with urgent matters of modernity.
 
Una’s Fellow
Yael Segalovitz, Comparative Literature
Dissertation Fellow
2017-2018

Yael Segalovitz explores the global travels of “close reading” techniques pioneered in the mid-20th century by Anglo-American scholars of New Criticism.

Milad Odabaei, Anthropology
Dissertation Fellow
2017-2018

Milad Odabaei examines the practices of reading and translation of European social thought in post-revolutionary Iran, where translation has emerged as a central form of intellectual production.

Jeffrey Kaplan, Philosophy
Dissertation Fellow
2017-2018

Jeffrey Kaplan’s work concerns the central problem in philosophy of law for the last century: how can human-made law have authority? Rather than offer a straightforward solution, Kaplan shows that the problem results from an ambiguity in the notion of authority.

Grace Harpster, History of Art
Dissertation Fellow
2017-2018

Grace Harpster’s work follows the pilgrimages of Cardinal Carlo Borromeo (1538–1584) in Italy, recreating his interactions with images to construct a theory of Counter-Reformation art based on practice.

Pages