All Townsend Fellows

Marjorie Burge, East Asian Languages & Cultures
Dissertation Fellow
2017-2018

Marjorie Burge examines the adoption of Chinese writing in Korea and Japan through the study of inscribed wooden tablets from the 6th through 8th centuries CE.

Dissertation Fellow
2017-2018

Joseph Albernaz mines the poetry and thought of the Romantic period (roughly 1760–1830) to uncover a new concept of community: a community that is groundless, and not based in a common nature, identity, trait, or essence.

Kate Heslop, Scandinavian
Assistant Professor Fellow
2017-2018

Kate Heslop’s project focuses on Old Norse court poetry, both the most complex and the longest-lived medium in which medieval Scandinavians memorialized, narrated, displayed, and performed cultural meaning.

Lisa Trever, History of Art
Assistant Professor Fellow
2017-2018

Lisa Trever asks how art and images can be interpreted in an ancient, “non-Western” setting a thousand years removed from textual sources. This problem is situated within a study of mural art made in north coastal Peru in 200–850 CE.

Damon Young, French and Film & Media
Assistant Professor Fellow
2017-2018

Damon Young examines aspects of Web 2.0 culture that suggest that the 21st-century self is no longer “private” or “interior” in the same way as the self that earlier expressed itself in the autobiography and the novel.

Rina Priyani, Architecture
Dissertation Fellow
2017-2018

Rina Priyani examines how architects, builders, citizens, politicians, and visionaries of the postcolonial world took part in the life of Bandung, Indonesia, foregrounding the roles of gender and ethnicity in the city's urban transformation.

Isabel Richter, History and German
Visiting Professor
2017-2018

Isabel Richter has published books on the history of left-wing resistance to National Socialism and the cultural history of death in the 19th century.

Adam Anderson, Near Eastern Studies
Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow
2017-2018

Adam Anderson’s work brings together the fields of archaeology and computational linguistics to reconstruct the social and economic networks documented during the late third to early second millennia in the ancient Near East (2110–1750 BCE).

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