All Townsend Fellows

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Rita Lucarelli, Near Eastern Studies
Assistant Professor Fellow
2016-2017

In her monograph on demonology, Rita Lucarelli addresses this central, though neglected, aspect of ancient Egyptian religion.

Brandon White
Brandon White, English
Dissertation Fellow
2015-2016

In his dissertation, “Artless: Ignorance in the Novel and the Making of Modern Character,” Brandon White argues that modernist novelists retained a model of characterization that remained readable to a wide audience, but repurposed that model to help readers unlearn socially imposed standards.

Joshua Williams
Joshua Williams, Theater, Dance & Performance Studies
Dissertation Fellow
2015-2016

In his dissertation project, “Don’t Show A Hyena How Well You Can Bite: Performance, Race and the Animal Subaltern in Eastern Africa,” Joshua Williams focuses on the animal in the political and performance history of colonial and postcolonial East Africa.

Samuel Robinson Image
Dissertation Fellow
2015-2016

In his dissertation project, “Flesh Be Made Spirit: Theology, Materialism, and Radical Religion in Early Modern England,” Samuel Robinson considers the relationship between conceptualizations of God and matter in seventeenth-century England.

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Jane Raisch, Comparative Literature
Dissertation Fellow
2015-2016

In her dissertation, “Fictions of Scholarship: Hermeneutics & Hellenism in Early Modern England,” Jane Raisch reimagines the period-defining narrative of the Renaissance as the age of classical rediscovery by investigating the impact of Greek antiquity on early modern English literature.

Stephanie Moore Image
Dissertation Fellow
2015-2016

Stephanie Moore's dissertation, “Allegory as Cognitive Technology in Early Modern England,” examines the role of allegory in English literary history by revealing its affinities with scholarly methods of sorting, retaining, and retrieving information.

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Chloe Kitzinger, Slavic Languages & Literatures
Dissertation Fellow
2015-2016

Chloe Kitzinger's dissertation, “Illusion and Instrument: The Lives of Characters in Dostoevsky and Tolstoy,” focuses critical attention on a problem in the history and theory of the novel: that realist characters exist independently from the author’s control, and even from the constraints of form.

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Katie Kadue, Comparative Literature
Dissertation Fellow
2015-2016

In her dissertation, “‘The living labours of publick men’: Poetic Production as Domestic Practice from Rabelais to Milton,” Katie Kadue explores how early modern French and English male authors conceived of their work as a form of domestic and reproductive labor, better understood as iterative rather than innovative.

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