All Townsend Fellows

Jake Dalton photo
Jacob Dalton, East Asian Languages & Cultures, , South & Southeast Asian Studies
Associate Professor Fellow
2014-2015

In his book project, The Spread of the Local: Ritual Manuals and the Rise of Tantra, Jacob Dalton examines the cache of ancient Tibetan manuscripts discovered a century ago in Dunhuang, on the old Silk Road, a collection that reveals the lost history of tantric Buddhism.

Photo of Anicia Timberlake
Dissertation Fellow
2014-2015

In her dissertation, “The Politics and Praxis of Children's Music Education in the German Democratic Republic, 1949-1989,” Anicia Timberlake examines East German educators’ and composers’ attempts to create effective socialist pedagogical practices.

Jocelyn photo
Jocelyn Rodal, English
Dissertation Fellow
2014-2015

Jocelyn Rodal’s dissertation, “ ‘A Few Sheets of Paper Covered with Arbitrary Symbols’: Formalism, Modernism, Mathematics,” bridges this gap by considering a moment in a field strikingly similar to literary theory, although never viewed as such.

Photo of Cullen Goldblatt
Cullen Goldblatt, Comparative Literature
Dissertation Fellow
2014-2015

Cullen Goldblatt’s dissertation, “Places of Complicity in Narratives of Historical Atrocity: Thiaroye, Dakar and District Six, Cape Town,” examines the narratives in literature, film, and oral accounts concerning these two African places and their associated historical atrocity.

Tehila Sasson photo
Tehila Sasson, History
Dissertation Fellow
2014-2015

In her dissertation, “From Empire to Humanity: Technologies of Famine Relief in an Era of Decolonization,” Tehila Sasson analyzes the emergence of global humanitarian ethics in the context of empire and its loss.

Chenxi Tang
Chenxi Tang, German
Associate Professor Fellow
2013-2014

Chenxi Tang’s project in German, "Imagining World Order: International Law and Literature in Europe, 1500-1900," is an intellectual and literary history of international order.

Rasheed Tazudeen
Dissertation Fellow
2013-2014

Rasheed Tazudeen’s dissertation in English, "Animal Metaphor and the Unmaking of the Human: Carroll, Flaubert, Joyce, Kafka, and Woolf," analyzes the “human” and the “nonhuman” as products of historical, material, cultural, and linguistic processes subject to change according to the ways they are expressed in literature.

Naomi Weiss
Naomi Weiss, Classics
Dissertation Fellow
2013-2014

In her dissertation, "Mousikē and Mythos: The Role of Choral Performance in Later Euripidean Tragedy," Naomi Weiss (Classics) examines the dramatic function of references to mousikē (music and dance) in the plays of Euripides, particularly in his supposedly "dithyrambic" choral odes.

Pages