All Townsend Fellows

Associate Professor Fellow
2018-2019
Christine Philliou (History) works on the transformation of the Ottoman Empire into the Modern Middle East and Balkans (1821-1922) and the ways in which that empire lived on in seemingly unconnected nation-states and regions.
 
Evan Muzzall, Digital Humanities
Postdoctoral Fellow
2018-2019
Evan Muzzall’s (Digital Humanities) work engages with a broad range of technological and anthropological issues — from the study of machine learning, to the ways in which environmental and cultural influences affect skeletal and dental development.
 
Dissertation Fellow
2018-2019
Melanie Gudesblatt (Music) works on the cultural history of voice in opera around 1900, focusing on how listeners used musical experience as a tool for grappling with urgent matters of modernity.
 
Una’s Fellow
Yael Segalovitz, Comparative Literature
Dissertation Fellow
2017-2018

Yael Segalovitz explores the global travels of “close reading” techniques pioneered in the mid-20th century by Anglo-American scholars of New Criticism.

Milad Odabaei, Anthropology
Dissertation Fellow
2017-2018

Milad Odabaei examines the practices of reading and translation of European social thought in post-revolutionary Iran, where translation has emerged as a central form of intellectual production.

Jeffrey Kaplan, Philosophy
Dissertation Fellow
2017-2018

Jeffrey Kaplan’s work concerns the central problem in philosophy of law for the last century: how can human-made law have authority? Rather than offer a straightforward solution, Kaplan shows that the problem results from an ambiguity in the notion of authority.

Grace Harpster, History of Art
Dissertation Fellow
2017-2018

Grace Harpster’s work follows the pilgrimages of Cardinal Carlo Borromeo (1538–1584) in Italy, recreating his interactions with images to construct a theory of Counter-Reformation art based on practice.

Marjorie Burge, East Asian Languages & Cultures
Dissertation Fellow
2017-2018

Marjorie Burge examines the adoption of Chinese writing in Korea and Japan through the study of inscribed wooden tablets from the 6th through 8th centuries CE.

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