All Townsend Fellows

Tehila Sasson photo
Tehila Sasson, History
Dissertation Fellow
2014-2015

In her dissertation, “From Empire to Humanity: Technologies of Famine Relief in an Era of Decolonization,” Tehila Sasson analyzes the emergence of global humanitarian ethics in the context of empire and its loss.

Photo of Anicia Timberlake
Dissertation Fellow
2014-2015

In her dissertation, “The Politics and Praxis of Children's Music Education in the German Democratic Republic, 1949-1989,” Anicia Timberlake examines East German educators’ and composers’ attempts to create effective socialist pedagogical practices.

Photo of Namwali Serpell
Assistant Professor Fellow
2014-2015

Namwali Serpell’s book project, “Faces: Unintended Pleasures,” reads the face not as a locus of subjectivity, but instead as a mediated and mediating thing.

Saira Mohamed
Saira Mohamed, Berkeley Law
Assistant Professor Fellow
2013-2014

Saira Mohamed’s work on deviance in international law originates in an understanding that the perpetrator of mass atrocity is different from the perpetrator of the ordinary, domestic crime. Mohamed seeks to understand how institutions responsible for developing and applying international criminal law characterize individuals before them as deviant rather than normal.

Jun Sunseri
Jun Sunseri, Anthropology
Assistant Professor Fellow
2013-2014

In his book project, "Moving Targets: Situational Identities along the Raiding Frontier of Colonial New Mexico," Jun Sunseri (Anthropology) argues that northern New Mexico communities used shrewd cross-cultural navigation between indigenous and colonial practices to negotiate strategic alliances with both sides of generations-old conflicts.

Chenxi Tang
Chenxi Tang, German
Associate Professor Fellow
2013-2014

Chenxi Tang’s project in German, "Imagining World Order: International Law and Literature in Europe, 1500-1900," is an intellectual and literary history of international order.

Rasheed Tazudeen
Dissertation Fellow
2013-2014

Rasheed Tazudeen’s dissertation in English, "Animal Metaphor and the Unmaking of the Human: Carroll, Flaubert, Joyce, Kafka, and Woolf," analyzes the “human” and the “nonhuman” as products of historical, material, cultural, and linguistic processes subject to change according to the ways they are expressed in literature.

Naomi Weiss
Naomi Weiss, Classics
Dissertation Fellow
2013-2014

In her dissertation, "Mousikē and Mythos: The Role of Choral Performance in Later Euripidean Tragedy," Naomi Weiss (Classics) examines the dramatic function of references to mousikē (music and dance) in the plays of Euripides, particularly in his supposedly "dithyrambic" choral odes.

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