All Townsend Fellows

Image of Erika Balsom.
Erika Balsom, Film & Media
Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow
2010-2011

Erika Balsom's research focuses on the intersections between cinema and contemporary art. Ms. Balsom recently completed her doctoral dissertation, "Exhibiting Cinema: The Moving Image in Art After 1990," in the Department of Modern Culture and Media at Brown University.

Image of Mont Allen.
Mont Allen, History of Art
Dissertation Fellow
2010-2011

Mont Allen’s dissertation in Art History argues that we have overlooked a central dimension of ancient image making: the communicative power of technique.

Marian Feldman, History of Art
Associate Professor Fellow
2010-2011

Project: "Artistic Materialities in the Early First Millennium Near East: Ivories and Bronzes in North Syria, Phoenicia, and Assyria"
Counterpart: Charles Altieri, English

Kevis Goodman, English
Associate Professor Fellow
2010-2011

Project: "Uncertain Disease: Nostalgia, Medicine, and the Poetics of Mobility"
Counterpart: Thomas Laqueur, History

Charles Hirschkind, Anthropology
Associate Professor Fellow
2010-2011

Project: "The 'Moorish Problem' and the Politics of Multiculturalism in Spain"
Counterpart: Jocelyne Guilbault, Music

Image of Eric Falci.
Eric Falci, English
Assistant Professor Fellow
2010-2011

Many of our notions of poetry base themselves within musical or quasi-musical discourses, and for many readers, poetry appears as verbal music. And yet, according to Assistant Professor of English Eric Falci, using the terms of music to talk about poetry, while irresistible, is necessarily off-the-mark.

Image of Luba Golburt.
Luba Golburt, Slavic Languages & Literatures
Assistant Professor Fellow
2010-2011

In “The First Epoch: The Eighteenth Century and the Russian Historical Imagination,” Assistant Professor Luba Golburt (Slavic Languages & Literatures) argues that the Russian Romantic historical consciousness matured through a close examination of the eighteenth century.

Image of Anastasia Kayiatos.
Anastasia Kayiatos, Slavic Languages & Literatures
Dissertation Fellow
2010-2011

In “Silence and Alterity in Russia after Stalin, 1955-1975,” Anastasia Kayiatos (Slavic Languages & Literatures) explores the conditions of speech and speechlessness under which the Soviet Union’s “others”—those marginalized by bodily differences of sexuality, gender, race, and disability—came to be as subjects and came together as socialites within late socialism.

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