Past Events

With Avenali Lecturer Joan Acocella
Friday, Feb 25, 2005 | 3:15 pm
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United States

Acocella with Alla Efimova (Judah L. Magnes Museum), Ramona Naddaff (Rhetoric), and Joshua Kosman (San Francisco Chronicle); moderated by Anthony J. Cascardi (Director, Consortium for the Arts).

Thursday, Feb 24, 2005 | 3:00 pm
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United States
With Avenali Resident Fellow Sheba Chhachhi
Wednesday, Feb 23, 2005 | 7:30 pm
159 Mulford Hall
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United States

Chhachhi examines dominant media representations which construct reductionist perceptions of the conflict in Kashmir.

Wednesday, Feb 23, 2005 | 4:00 pm
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall
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United States

Panel Discussants: Joan Acocella, Joe Goode (Theater, Dance and Performance Studies), Wendy Lesser (Editor, The Threepenny Review) and Suzana Sawyer (Anthropology, UC Davis)

Photo of Joan Acocella.
“Ballet and Sex”
Avenali Lecture
Tuesday, Feb 22, 2005 | 7:30 pm
Morrison Reading Room, Doe Library
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United States

Joan Acocella is a dance and book critic for The New Yorker. She has served as the senior critic and reviews editor for Dance Magazine and New York dance critic for London’s Financial Times.

Photo of Sheba Chhachhi.
With Avenali Resident Fellow Sheba Chhachhi
Saturday, Feb 19, 2005 | 11:30 am to 5:30 pm
2063 Valley Life Sciences Building
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United States

At this workshop, Chhachhi discusses the slippage between the unmediated “truth” of testimony and the highly mediated statements made by artists around the same experience.

Photographs by Avenali Resident Fellow Sheba Chhachhi and Sonia Jabbar
Thursday, Feb 17, 2005 to Friday, Feb 25, 2005
Department of Art Practice Exhibit Room, 235 Kroeber Hall
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United States

This photo installation by Chhachhi and Sonia Jabbar invites viewers to enter the private life of war, to hear voices often obscured by the clamor of stereotypes—the unheard voices of ordinary women of the Kashmir Valley. Testimonies gathered over six years break through the homogenizing divide of “Muslims” versus “Hindus.” Despite many differences, the women have one overwhelming thing in common: a rejection of the gun as a solution to political issues.

Image of a soldier flailing with a scarf around his eyes, created by Alice Wingwall.
Artworks by Alice Wingwall
Exhibit
Thursday, Feb 17, 2005 to Monday, Apr 4, 2005
Townsend Center, 220 Stephens Hall
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United States

This show features an in-depth look at the artwork of Alice Wingwall. A sculptor, photographer, and filmmaker, Wingwall experienced a progressive loss of vision as a result of retinitis pigmentosa. Her self-portraits and drawings attest to her deep knowledge of and relationship with architecture. 

Photographs by Avenali Resident Fellow Sheba Chhachhi
Tuesday, Feb 8, 2005 to Saturday, Feb 19, 2005
Department of Architecture Exhibit Room, 108 Wurster Hall
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United States

This exhibition relocates the mythological figure of Neelkanth, in the contemporary Indian city, where each of the five elements (earth, fire, water, air, and ether), the five senses (smell, sight, taste, touch, and hearing), and the power of the word itself is poisoned. The exhibit asks if we, like the archetypal Neelkanth, can find means of containment and transformation; if we can make nectar from poison.

Low-angled photo of two women holding hands and wearing simple robes.
Photographs by Avenali Resident Fellow Sheba Chhachhi
Exhibit
Friday, Feb 4, 2005 to Tuesday, Feb 15, 2005
Townsend Center, 220 Stephens Hall
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United States

Sheba Chhachhi, an installation artist, photographer, activist, and writer based in New Delhi, India, was on campus for the month of February 2005 in a visit organized by the Women’s Studies department and funded by the Townsend Departmental Residency Program. Created in collaboration with women renunciates and ecstatics in various parts of India, the photographs in this exhibition seek to share the unusual lives of contemporary women sadhus—from the almost naked beatific to the power-dressing female mahant.

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