Townsend Events

In the Matter of Nat Turner: A Speculative History

Christopher Tomlins
Berkeley Book Chats
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| Online

Christopher Tomlins offers a new interpretation of Nat Turner and the slave rebellion that stunned the American South.

Joyce Carol Oates

In Conversation with John Shoptaw
Thursday, Oct 1, 2020 4:00 pm
| Online

Joyce Carol Oates, author of over 70 works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, talks with poet John Shoptaw.

Jeannie Suk Gersen

Jeannie Suk Gersen
Una's Lecture
Wednesday, Oct 14, 2020 4:00 pm
| Online
Jeannie Suk Gersen is a feminist legal scholar and contributing writer at the New Yorker. She is joined in conversation by political theorist Wendy Brown.

Roundtable with Jeannie Suk Gersen

With Joshua Cohen and Marianne Constable
Thursday, Oct 15, 2020 4:00 pm
| Online

Jeannie Suk Gersen, the 2020-21 Una's Lecturer, is joined in conversation by UC Berkeley faculty members Joshua Cohen and Marianne Constable.

The Trouble with Literature

Victoria Kahn
Berkeley Book Chats
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| Online

Victoria Kahn argues that the literature of the English Reformation (written during the fraught years of the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries) marks a turning point in Western thinking about literature and literariness.

Midnight la Frontera

Ken Light
Berkeley Book Chats
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| Online

Documentary photographer Ken Light and author José Ángel Navejas discuss their book, which features photographs of U.S. border patrol agents on their nighttime shifts on the Mexican border in the 1980s.

Changing the Narrative: What Stories Can We Tell Now?

(Re)making Sense: The Humanities and Pandemic Culture
Thursday, Oct 29, 2020 5:00 pm
| Online

Anthony Cascardi and Catherine Gallagher ask how narrative gives sense to events, and whether narrative forms that have served in times of past crisis (the novel, the epic, history writing) might provide meaning in the pandemic era.

Archive Feelings: A Theory of Greek Tragedy

Mario Telò
Berkeley Book Chats
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| Online

Bringing an innovative synthesis of postmodern theories to bear on his reading of ancient Greek tragedy, Mario Telò offers a new way of understanding tragic aesthetics.